Hand nerve function after mountain bike cycling

Authors

  • Gustav Fardelin Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, SE 70182 Örebro, Sweden
  • Niklas Ricklund Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Faculty of Business, Science and Engineering, Örebro University, SE 70182 Örebro, Sweden
  • Ing-Liss Bryngelsson Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, SE 70182 Örebro, Sweden

Keywords:

mountain bike, trail, cycling, hand-arm vibration syndrome, quantitative sensory testing

Abstract

Hand-arm vibrations can cause permanent injuries and temporary changes affecting the sensory and circulatory systems in the hands. Vibrational effects have been thoroughly studied within the occupational context concerning work with handheld vibrating tools. Less is known about vibrational exposure and risk of effects during cycling. In the present study, 10 cyclists were recruited for exposure measurements of hand-arm vibrations during mountain bike cycling on the trail, and the effects on the nerve function were examined with quantitative sensory testing (QST) before and after the ride.

The intervention group was compared to a control group that consisted of men exposed to hand-arm vibrations from a polishing machine. The results of the QST did not statistically significantly differ between the intervention and study groups. The intervention group showed a lesser decrease in vibration perception in digitorum II, digitorum V, and hand grip strength than the control group. It was concluded that no acute effects on nerve function in the dominant hand were measured after mountain bike cycling on the trail, despite high vibration doses through the handlebars.

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Published

2022-07-23

How to Cite

Fardelin , G., Ricklund, N., & Bryngelsson , I.-L. (2022). Hand nerve function after mountain bike cycling. Journal of Science and Cycling. Retrieved from https://jsc-journal.com/index.php/JSC/article/view/764

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Original articles

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